Please help liberate Samuel Sixtos from detention!

Hi everyone! I just wanted to share this petition in hopes of helping get the signatures needed. RAIZ is working on stopping the deportation of Samuel Sixtos who was turned over to ICE in violation of the Trust Act They need 200 signatures today 9/16 by 5pm. RAIZ is a grassroots organization located in Santa Ana, Orange County that actively works to stop deportations and keep families together.

If you could please share this with your followers, it would be greatly appreciated! Thank You!

RAIZ Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/raizyouth

#FreeSamuel #Not1More #FreeThePeople #LiberenAlPueblo #MigrantLivesMatter

Anonymous asked: if Hispanic and Latino both are not a race, if I have heritage from El Salvador but was born in America what race do I fall under??? i have no white or African people in my family just latino and I am confused

There’s no such thing as being “just Latinx.” Latinxs come in all colors, ethnicity, and races. Everyone’s family who’s not indigenous to South America got there somehow: immigration from another country, brought over as a slave from Africa, colonized the land after Spain and Portugal took over, etc. I don’t know what you look like or have intimate knowledge of your family’s history, so I can’t know what race you fall under. You could be a white Latinx. You could be a mixed Latinx (black and white, white and Asian, Asian and indigenous, anything). You could even be an Arab Latinx! It all depends on your family’s history and heritage. Regardless of your heritage, you and your family may still choose to ID primarily as Latinx if that is the most salient part of your experience to you. That’s fine. But as far as racial constructs go and where different people have fallen within them historically, be aware that race is a tool of oppression. Be sure before you claim certain racial identities, as you could inadvertently co-opt struggles that are not your own.

Also FYI, here is what Wikipedia has to say about race in El Salvador:

The country’s population is composed of Mestizos, whites, and indigenous peoples. Eighty-six percent of Salvadorans are of mixed ancestry. In the mestizo population, Salvadorans of predominantly Spanish descent, Afro-Salvadoran, and Native Indigenous who are not connected to indigenous customs or language, all identify themselves as Mestizo culturally.

El Salvador is the only Central American country that has no visible African population today, which is the result of racial intermixing during colonial times. Africans that were brought to El Salvador completely mixed into the Mestizo population, creating Afro-Mestizo Salvadorans. Africans are also not visible because of El Salvador’s isolation from the Atlantic Central American coastline, where the slave trade occurred for centuries. This scarcity of African population is also due to laws imposed by the Spanish and Criollos around the 17th century after a slave revolt in San Salvador, which were sustained by authorities even after independence was won from Spain in 1821, and slavery was abolished.

El Salvador is the only Central American country that has no visible African population today, which is the result of racial intermixing during colonial times. Africans that were brought to El Salvador completely mixed into the Mestizo population, creating Afro-Mestizo Salvadorans. Africans are also not visible because of El Salvador’s isolation from the Atlantic Central American coastline, where the slave trade occurred for centuries. This scarcity of African population is also due to laws imposed by the Spanish and Criollos around the 17th century after a slave revolt in San Salvador, which were sustained by authorities even after independence was won from Spain in 1821, and slavery was abolished.

During most of the 20th century, immigration of people of African descent was restricted by law. General Maximiliano Hernández Martínez instituted race laws in 1930 that prohibited four[clarification needed] ethnic groups — blacksGypsies, and Asians — from entering the country. It was not until the 1980s that this law was rescinded, although it was never implemented forcefully. Regardless of these racial laws, Afro-Salvadorans are present in some areas due to immigrants arriving from neighboring countries like BelizeHonduras, and Nicaragua, who eventually mixed in with the local populations. Arabs, mostly Palestinian Christians, are today one of the most notable immigrant groups in El Salvador, despite their relatively small numbers.[67][68] Denying this, the book “Seeing Indians: A Study of Race, Nation, and Power in El Salvador”, by Virginia Q. Tilley, states on page 210, “…no twentieth-century law or regulation ever prohibited the entry, settlement, or patriation of blacks, under the Martinez dictatorship or any other regime.” There have been several publications presenting information about Africans in what is now El Salvador during the colonial period.

That’s not the clearest record ever, but it’s a starting point for deeper research. It’s Wikipedia, so grain of salt.

There is totally a push-back by US Latinxs against the way the census asks what race you are and whether your are “Hispanic” or “Non-Hispanic.” The push-back is understandable given that not all Latinxs understand the historical context for the racial categories described in the census. On the other hand, the argument for listing “Hispanic/Latinx” as a race all its own is inherently anti-black and anti-indigenous as it would erase them from the official records and thus make it more difficult to address the disparities that exist between white Latinxs and brown/black Latinxs even in the US. 

Anonymous asked: I'm an Angry Latinx bc colorism and the failure of any radical latinx that is lightskinned and beyond to talk about it.

hiiii a friend and i have been working hard together to start a new blog, and i’m excited to announce that it’s launching!! it would be great if you could help promote us! (: (if not, i understand)

the blog is called mobmaterial and the point is to create a place that celebrates poc in counter culture/youth subcultures, which are spaces that usually represent only able-bodied, thin cis white people, thereby erasing the presence and contributions of poc. this is a space for all of us to gather, celebrate each other, and share inspiration/art. this is NOT a space for yt’s or cis-males!

moreover, we want to help provide a platform for poc artists, esp those who are just starting out and want more exposure for their work. are you an artist? do you have short stories, spoken word, dance, art, etc that you want to share? this is the space for you!!

we would especially appreciate your support as we are aiming to be as inclusive as possible, including trans poc! if you choose to support us, we would also be immensely thankful for recommendations of blogs to ask for support.

please support us as we work to make this blog grow! thank you guys! (:

There you go, y’all. Give it a peep. ^^^^^^^^

Countries of Latin America

(Source: taakeyou)

http://khromejio.tumblr.com/post/97200673655/flanneryogonner-hi-yall-ive-compiled-a

flanneryogonner:

Hi y’all!

I’ve compiled a list of readings that speak to issues of nationalism, indigeneity, colonialism, and resistance/decolonization

The list is of course limited to what readings I’ve encountered at some point. They also come from a variety of academic disciplines and…

postracialcomments:

Protests today in Ferguson

nezua:

fnhfal:

Ferguson -2014

I blinked one day and when I opened my eyes, it was normal to have an American army battling Americans on American streets. No one even calls it a war. But it is.

Why Your Support of MisSpelled Matters

thewitchesofmisspelled:

"Published on YouTube June 25, 2014, five female characters were featured in an experimental pilot. Not caricatures, but cleverly crafted and sympathetic, humorous and relateable, their inner stream of consciousness astoundingly familiar with a supernatural twist. These characters have curves, represent many skin shades, and were brought together by the powers they possess. They’re witches without a clue. And I’ve been hooked on this new web series aptly titled MisSpelled since!…”

READ MOREEEEE

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reclaimingthelatinatag:

In Janitors’ Own Words: Austraberta Rodriguez

In this clip by In Janitors’ Own Words, Austraberta Rodriguez shares her experience as janitor in Houston, Texas. At the time this video was shot, janitors in Houston were being paid as little as $20 a day, worked in hazardous conditions, and weren’t offered any type of benefits. In 2006 Rodriguez, along with thousands of Houston janitors, joined a labor strike that would eventually lead to an increase of wages and a low-cost health plan for Texan janitors.